Caring for a Disabled Child: How to Manage Your Stress

Every parent will need to master stress management when caring for a child; however, this is essential if you are raising a son or daughter with a physical or learning disability.

In addition to dealing with typical parental stress, you might also need to handle the unique challenges of parenting a child who has additional needs.

There is, however, no shame in admitting to yourself or others that you are feeling the strain. You also need to learn how to manage your stress levels to live a happier life.


Confide in Your Loved Ones

Rather than unhealthily bottling up your emotions, you should lean on your loved ones for emotional support. While you might find it easier to pretend that everything is fine, this could cause you to feel alone and stressed. Instead, you must open up to your loved ones about how you are feeling, as their love and support could lift your mood and make you feel more supported.

Take a Break

There might be certain times when you feel as if you cannot find one minute to yourself. If this is the case, you should aim to take a break. For example, many parents often find it helpful to walk to a local park or around their area with their child. It will allow your little one to enjoy a change of environment and you could enjoy some much-needed headspace.

You also should make time for yourself when your child is asleep; for example, you could:

  • Take a bath
  • Embrace a hobby
  • Watch a TV show
  • Exercise
  • Read a book

Secure Financial Support

It is likely your child might require learning or physical aids in their everyday life, which could cost a significant sum. As a result, you might be worried about how you will fund their essential equipment. There are, however, options available to cater to their needs. 

For example, you could a claim compensation for cerebral palsy, and the money you receive could improve your child’s quality of life while removing the financial stress from your family.

Create a Detailed Schedule

Lower your stress levels by creating a schedule, so you will know exactly what you need to do each day and when you need to do it. Start with the most important tasks first and work your way down the list, and only complete the less important tasks if you have the time or will to do so. A schedule can clear your mind of clutter and make large tasks appear much more manageable.

Talk to a Doctor About Your Emotions

If you are feeling tired, stressed, depressed, or unable to cope, you must talk to your doctor about receiving additional support and medical treatment. 

Before you attend an appointment, think carefully about how you are feeling to accurately describe your emotions to a GP. As a result, they could offer medication, respite care, or coping strategies, which could help you to live a happier, stress-free life.