Children typically outgrow their bedroom once they leave the toddler years behind. Unless you want your child’s toys and games all over the living room, it’s handy to give them their very own playroom, where they can set up Lego cities and art stations without disrupting adult time. In this article, we have some tips to help you create a fun, creative, and age-appropriate space for your kids.

Lighting

Lighting is very important. Many rooms have a central lighting pendant, which is fine, but wall lights in addition to a central light are a good idea. The problem with one pendant light is that it creates shadows in corners, and it can also be too bright late at night. Wall lights offer an alternative. You can fit decorative lights that suit the room’s décor. With this in mind, check out the range of wall lights on lights.co.uk. This website has a huge range of lighting to suit all budgets, including outdoor lighting, designer lights, and wall lights for kids’ rooms. 

Child-friendly wall lights with an owl motif are a great choice for younger kids. There are also flexible wall lights, which are handy when fitted above a workstation. In addition, you will find energy efficient LED lights. LED bulbs last for thousands of hours, so it won’t matter if your kids leave the lights on all night long.  

Flooring

Carpets are often the first choice for parents, but in a playroom, there could be better options. For one thing, carpets are susceptible to spillages, such as paint or juice. A better option might be laminate flooring, which is inexpensive and easy to fit yourself if you have the right tools. Laminate and other hard flooring are ideal for younger kids, who can set up car racetracks and push their toys around more easily. It’s also easy to clean when there are spillages. If you are concerned that laminate is noisy or uncomfortable for little ones, add a soft rug or two.

If you do elect to fit a carpet, pick an inexpensive one in a neutral colour with a good quality underlay. This will prolong the lifespan of the carpet, while not causing you heart palpitations each time you have to clean up spilt juice. 

Window Treatments

A children’s playroom needs curtains or blinds to keep the sun out on a hot day and the heat in on a cold night. Curtains are cheap and easy to match to any décor, but they can look a bit frumpy in a kid’s room. Blinds are more modern in appearance and you can find a blind to suit any colour scheme. Be careful, however, that any blind you purchase has a safety cord to prevent any accidents. All good retailers include this as standard these days. 

Wooden plantation shutters are an alternative to blinds and curtains. These look stylish and are perfect if your playroom doubles as an occasional guest room. 

Furniture

This may not be a bedroom, but it still needs furniture. Cube units are perfect for playrooms. Buy crates to fit into the cube so your child has plenty of storage for toys. Add a bookcase so there is somewhere for books, and if you have a lot of soft toys, hook some toy storage nets to the ceiling. 

Since your child will probably be spending a lot of time in this room, it’s a good idea to add a comfortable chair or small sofa, where they can lie down with a good book or their handheld games console. Alternatively, buy some large floor beanbags for them and their friends. Finally, a desk for older children will give them a place where they can do their homework, and for younger kids, a space to draw and paint. 

Accessories

Don’t forget to include some appropriate accessories, such as reading lamps, pictures and posters, and anything that adds some interest to the room. Cushions and throws are ideal for chairs and sofas. You could even stick a blackboard on the wall so your kids can draw with chalks, practice their writing, or leave you notes. For older kids, fix a TV to the wall, preferably on a pivot mount, so it can be adjusted more easily.

Décor for Younger Kids

Try and make the room as bright and cheerful as possible. If you are handy with a paintbrush, have a go at painting a mural on one of the walls. Use some illustrated children’s books as your inspiration. If you don’t have much confidence in your artistic abilities, stick some movie posters on the wall instead. 

Décor for Older Kids and Teens

It’s best to let older kids and teenagers have some input in the décor. They will doubtless have their own ideas about how they want the room to look. If they are old enough, let them paint the walls. It saves you a job!

When the time comes to move, all you need to do is repaint the walls in a neutral colour, put a bed in the playroom, and call it a bedroom.